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Full text of "NightRider"

259

building. He could see cracks of light where the windows
were, Up the hill he could see, vaguely, the mass of another
building, and a little light. That, he decided, must be the
dwelling-house. He reached the academy building and
fumbled for the door. His hand came into contact with the
rough surface of a log, and then chinking. He found the
latch, lifted it, and entered.

When he entered the long room, he was aware, even as his
eyes adjusted themselves to the sudden light, of a tenseness,
a hush, The backs of all the men were toward him. He
quietly closed the door, took off his gloves and coat, and
moved toward the nearer of the two big fireplaces that heated
the room.

" That's the size of it," a man at the other end of the room
was saying. Then there was silence again, except for the
nervous shuffling of some man's boots on the board floor.
The men were scattered in several groups about the room,
sitting on top of desks or lounging against the walls. Doctor
MacDonald stood in front of the other hearth, his head bent
over a piece of paper. He raised his head, straightened to
his height, and passed his gaze deliberately over the men
assembled. Then he said, "For the benefit of Mr. Munn,
who has just come in, I'll read this communication again."

"I'm sorry to have inconvenienced the meeting," Mr.
Munn apologized. " I miscalculated the distance, I reckon."

"This is a letter received by Mr. Murdock, here," and
Doctor MacDonald inclined his long head toward a heavy-
featured, dark man who lounged against the wall, near one
of the lamp brackets. Then he added, "Unsigned." Hav-
ing pronounced the word, he smiled confidentially at the
men, with the air of one who feels it unnecessary to point
the humour of a situation, and then began to read.

DEAR MR. MURBOCK,

If you knows what is good fer you, you will git rid of
them niggers on yore place and git you some white croppers
like a white man ought When January gits here you better